EC - Economics

EC 106 Survey of Economics

Provides an introduction to contemporary economic issues and accompanying public policies. Topics covered include inflation, deficit, unemployment, interest rates and financial institutions, social security, pollution, prices, and profits of businesses. This course is designed for non-majors. Departmental majors may take the course, but also must complete EC 201-202.

EC 189 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

EC 201 Principles of Microeconomics

Basic economic principles of individual and business decision-making concerning the use of resources and products in the marketsetting of the U.S. economy. Fundamentals of supply and demand and microeconomics are emphasized in this semester course.

EC 202 Principles of Macroeconomics

This course discusses national economic activity including the role of money and financial institutions in the U.S. economy. Topics include balance of payment problems, international economics, and the role of the government and Federal Reserve system in achieving full employment and price stability.

EC 203 Project Management Economics

This course introduces students to three vital components of project management, each of which contains economic aspects. The three components are financial activities of the project manager, economic analysis, and legal considerations. Examples and case studies will address situations that require decisions having economic implications from project managers in the industrial, commercial, professional, and public sectors. Topics covered include developing project scopes, schedules and budgets, evaluating capital expenditures, considering operational costs, reviewing contracts and specifications, and addressing ethical dilemmas. Three class hours per week.

EC 389 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

EC 389W Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

EC 393 India: Socioeconomic Issues(GDorND)

One in six individuals is Indian. The socioeconomic status of these individuals is framed by the country's rich traditions and developed through a combination of education, occupation, and income. Students exploring global diversity will examine India's delicate balance between tradition and modernization including globalization's impact on traditional gender roles, the family, and related socioeconomic issues. In this process, students will develop an appreciation of Indian culture and its influence over business relationships. Students exploring national diversity will consider socioeconomic issues experienced by Indians living in the United States along with possible biases faced due to religious or cultural heritage.

EC 485 Independent Study

Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

EC 499 Senior Thesis

The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.