HNR - Honor Scholars Program Courses

HNR 150 Classical Greek & Roman Thought

The Honors Scholars seminar series begins by the examination of the origins of philosophical speculations in the Greek and Roman worlds. Idealism and realism is explored through the dialogues, plays, and epics penned from 500 BC to 500 AD, which provide the basis for Western Thought.

HNR 189 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

HNR 250 Judeo-Christian & Medieval Thought (WI)

The Honors Scholars seminar series continues with this overview of the origins and themes held within the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures. These origins and themes are then projected through the medieval period, 500 AD - 1500 AD, in treatises and in literature, including Old and Middle English epics and lyric poetry.

HNR 251 Renaissance Thought

The Honors Scholars seminar series continues with this overview of the flowering of the aesthetic sense, the rediscovery of classical thought, and the beginnings of the scientific revolution, via art, literature, and social theory, 1450 AD-1600 AD.

HNR 289 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

HNR 350 Restoration & Enlightenment Thought

The Honors Scholars seminar series continues by weaving the rise of the scientific revolution with the leading social philosophies of the 17th and 18th centuries, including empiricism, rationalism, and idealism, including the roles of satire, farce, and drama in literature.

HNR 351 Honors Scholars Service Learning

This course integrates the Honors Scholars Program's emphasis on caritas(social responsibility through involvement off campus) with its focus on the Great Books and critical thinking. Students in this course commit to serving two hours each week with a Title I school to help students with their reading and critical thinking skills. This course also includes weekly written reflections and weekly class meetings to share experiences and their relationship to the Honors Scholars Program.

HNR 389 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

HNR 450 Modern Thought

The Honors Scholars seminar series continues with an examination of the romantic period of the early 19th century and extends into more recent theories and discourse revolving around self and society, including social and cultural developments through the 19th and 20th centuries through contemporary literature and science.

HNR 485 Independent Study

Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

HNR 495 Honors Scholars Program Capstone

The themes of the Honors Scholars Program have been knowledge, charity, and the humanities: over the last five semesters, you have explored the interrelations among these three concepts by way of a careful examination of the Great Books. Now it is time for you engage two of these texts in a conversation about one the program's central questions. Over the next 14 weeks, you will propose, develop, and execute an original piece of scholarship aimed at illuminating two texts.

HNR 499 Senior Thesis

The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.