ENWR - English Writing

ENWR101 College Writing

This course covers the basic elements of writing-grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraphs to help prepare students for college writing. It is also concerned with audience, voice, and techniques for generating and organizing ideas into an essay, as well as introduction to the library.

ENWR102 College Composition II

A preparation for students to write within the larger academic community. Students study conventions of effective writing for various types of academic essays, including research papers. Includes instruction in online and library research.

Placement determined by score on national exams or passing grade in ENWR 101.

ENWR189 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENWR264 Introduction to Creative Writing (WI)

After preliminary instruction in the basic elements and techniques of creative writing, students create original works of poetry and fiction and polish them in workshops with other members of the class. The course is open to those who have not had a poetry or fiction writing course in college.

ENWR289 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENWR302 Expository Writing (WI)

Intermediate Writing. The study and practice of advanced exposition, including creative non-fiction genres and argumentation. Students read professional writers and critique classmates' drafts. The course emphasizes techniques for revising and polishing expository prose.

ENWR303 Grant Writing (WI)

Intermediate Writing. This course provides students with knowledge and skills in the grant writing process. Through a combination of readings, lectures, assignments and a full written grant proposal, students will gain knowledge and experience in the major elements of grant writing, including grant sources, grant proposals, timelines, budgets, informed consent forms, the review process and grant management.

ENWR305 Workplace Writing (WI)

Intermediate Writing.

This course prepares students to meet the demands of workplace writing in business, administrative, and technical fields. Focused on understanding the reader as a basis for planning and drafting documents, students work on discovering the purpose, structure, and appropriate level of detail for on-the-job writing. Practice is offered in a variety of workplace genres, including flyers, instructions, brochures, webpages, proposals, letters, memos, resumes, formal and informal reports. Students also cultivate workplace style, especially in the areas of clarity, concision, cohesion, and correctness. Attention also given to formatting documents in professional ways.

ENWR306 Writing for the Print Media (WI)

Students learn basic elements of journalistic writing for the print media, including news reporting, feature writing, and column writing. Course includes study of libel law, observation of community media, and production of one issue of the school newspaper. Students will learn AP Style, the gold standard for journalistic writing.

ENWR337 Creative Writing Genres and Modes (WI)

In-depth study and practice of a major genre or mode of contemporary writing, such as drama, memoir, or nature writing. Topic selected by the instructor.

ENWR347 Creative Writing Genres and Modes (WI)

In-depth study and practice of a major genre or mode of contemporary writing, such as drama, memoir, or nature writing. Topic selected by the instructor.

ENWR363 Literary Translation

Literary Translation is a literature and creative writing course designed to help you improve your understanding of Spanish literature while you translate Latin American literary works into English and polish your translations through workshops. The course provides instruction in the structures and nuances of the work of one contemporary Latin American writer (usually a poet) together with workshops in the translation of literary works from Spanish of English. Our goal will be to produce publishable-quality translations of previously untranslated works of literature.

ENWR389 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENWR425 ENWR Internship

Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the intership coordinator at the Career Services Office.

ENWR461 Adv Creative Writing (WI)

Advanced Creative Writing is a weekly meeting of experienced writers of poetry and fiction (and other genres) for the purpose of honing their skills through a semester of extensive writing and rigorous workshops with other advanced student writers. Students who take the course for fewer than three credits are given reduced submission requirements, but must still attend and participate in all workshop meetings. Since the course is a workshop, the content varies from year to year.

ENWR485 Independent Study

Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

ENWR489 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENWR498 Capstone Seminar (WI)

The English Capstone Workshop is a writing course in which advanced English majors practice professional writing and presentation skills and aid one another in the further development of these skills. The course is required for all English majors who are in the last fall semester of study before graduation. Members of the class plan the Carroll College Literary Festival, held on campus in November; they propose, organize, and coordinate sessions on subjects of interest in literature, writing, and English Educatio and they issue calls for papers to English majors and other interested parties for presentation at the conference. Students then spend the semester writing senior projects, regularly subjecting submitting drafts the texts they are working on to intensive workshops by the other members of the class. They then present portions of their final project at the literary festival.

ENWR499 Senior Thesis

The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.