FR - French

FR101 Elementary French I (CD)(GD)

A beginning course in French with emphasis on speaking with attention to reading and writing as well. Three (3) class periods and one supervised conversation each week.

FR101L Elementary French I CD GD Lab

FR102 Elementary French II (CD)(GD)

A beginning course in French with emphasis on speaking with attention to reading and writing as well. Three (3) class periods and one supervised conversation each week.

FR102L Elementary French II (GD) Lab

Language lab.

FR149 French Immersion Weekend

FR150 French Immersion Abroad (GD)

This program consists of three levels of proficiency: FR 150 for students with no prior knowledge or experience with French, FR 250 for students who have successfully completed FR 102 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with French, and FR 350 for students who have successfully completed FR 204 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with French. The program offers the student the opportunity to become immersed in the French language while experiencing the cultural and societal conditions of the country where the program takes place. The methods used in this program are intended to foster the acquisition of French both in and out of the classroom. The acquisition will take place through students' and teachers' active interaction with the language and daily life in the host country. Students will read, write, and speak French on a daily basis and will be required to analyze social, political, and cultural aspects of their surroundings. Through this process, students also will have the opportunity to develop new perspectives with regard to peoples of other cultures and a point of comparison upon which to base questions of human existence.

FR189 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

FR203 Intermediate French I (CD)(GD)

Reading of contemporary texts with conversation and composition. Directed toward the development of a speaking, writing, and reading knowledge of French. Three (3) class periods and one supervised conversation each week. 

FR203L Intermediate French I CD GD Lab

Language lab.

FR204 Intermediate French II CD/GD

Reading of contemporary texts with conversation and composition. Directed toward the development of a speaking, writing, and reading knowledge of French. Three (3) class periods and one supervised conversation each week. 

FR204L Intermediate French II GD Lab

Language lab.

FR250 French Immersion Abroad (GD)

This program consists of three levels of proficiency: FR 150 for students with no prior knowledge or experience with French, FR 250 for students who have successfully completed FR 102 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with French, and FR 350 for students who have successfully completed FR 204 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with French. The program offers the student the opportunity to become immersed in the French language while experiencing the cultural and societal conditions of the country where the program takes place. The methods used in this program are intended to foster the acquisition of French both in and out of the classroom. The acquisition will take place through students' and teachers' active interaction with the language and daily life in the host country. Students will read, write, and speak French on a daily basis and will be required to analyze social, political, and cultural aspects of their surroundings. Through this process, students also will have the opportunity to develop new perspectives with regard to peoples of other cultures and a point of comparison upon which to base questions of human existence.

FR289 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

FR295 Franco-American Institute (CD GD)

This course facilitates cross-cultural exchange and collaboration through a comparative analysis of two case studies, those of the United States and France. The course will first provide students with basic historical backgrounds of these two case studies. We will then examine the ways in which this history informs global issues today, focusing in on both the local case studies of Montana and Le Havre, and looking outwards as to how the United States and France interact with the world more broadly. The course is conducted in English, and co-taught by professors from Carroll College and the Université du Havre in France. Enrolled students will be both from the Université du Havre and from Carroll College. Although the course is conducted entirely online, we meet regularly via remote instruction, and privilege intercultural and international exchange between the French and American students. Students are placed early on with a partner, with whom they are expected to meet on a regular basis to discuss the current course readings and lectures, and to share their distinct perspectives on the issues. Each semester will select a more specific focus for this cross-cultural exchange; examples include globalization, gastronomy, and second language learning. Offered at the discretion of the French & Francophone Studies Program. The course is conducted in English.

FR301 Litt�raturefrancophone de L'Afrique GD

Litt�rature francophone de l'Afrique Francophone et des Antilles Fran�aises A study of representative written passages from various authors of Francophone Africa and the French Antilles. Analysis of various readings in both discussions and compositions. The course also covers the arts, history, and present political situation of the countries studied (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Niger, Mali, Senegal, Burkina-Faso, Martinique, and Guadeloupe). An allied class of the minor in Latin American Studies.

FR302 French Literature Thru 18th Cent GD WI

French Literature Through the 18th Century . A study of representative oral and written passages from various authors of French literature from the Middle Ages through the 18th century. Analysis of the readings and listening programs in both discussions and compositions. The course also covers the arts and the history of that period.

FR303 Adv Grammar and Composition CD GD WI

Advanced Grammar and Composition. This course is designed to strengthen students' comprehension and application of the most challenging grammatical structures for second language learners within a meaningful written language context. This objective will be accomplished through a thorough review and practice of problematic grammatical structures, and the application of these structures in writing and discussion sessions. Students will learn to write creatively as well as in both expository and argumentative formats. The course will be conducted in French.

FR304 French & Francophone Civil &Cult CD

Introduction to French and Francophone Civilization and Culture. This course introduces students to French civilization and culture from the Middle Ages through the 20th century, and is intended to be taken after FR 303. Students will read a variety of primary source documents in French, and will be introduced to major historical, cultural, and literary movements during these time periods, as well as major French thinkers and writers. The course assignments will focus on written and cultural competency. During the semester, students will learn how to read both critically and creatively, analyzing the strategies that different authors use to express their ideas, create their literary worlds, and engage the reader. The course will focus on interpretation in both oral and written form. The analytical approach presented in this course will prepare students for more advanced classes in literature and culture. The course aims, then, to expose students to a wide range of French-language texts and encourage learners to create more critical, insightful and engaging readings of texts.

FR305 Imm. Et Int. En France Moderne

Immigration et Intégration dans la France moderne. This course addresses a number of contemporary issues in modern France with regards to its policies and practices of immigration. After a brief examination of traditional conceptions of the French nation and of French citizenship, we pass to a historical overview of the causes of significant waves of immigration in France, such as the world wars, French colonialism, and the Syrian refugee crisis. The course concludes with some in-depth examinations of salient issues related to immigration into France, in particular, racial and cultural integration, French Republicanism, recent upsurges in populism, laïcité, and the 2018 soccer World Cup. The course fulfills an Intermediate Writing core requirement. Students will complete short writing assignments through multiple drafts, and complete research and a presentation on a topic of their choice.

FR350 French Immersion Abroad (GD)

This program consists of three levels of proficiency: FR 150 for students with no prior knowledge or experience with French, FR 250 for students who have successfully completed FR 102 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with French, and FR 350 for students who have successfully completed FR 204 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with French. The program offers the student the opportunity to become immersed in the French language while experiencing the cultural and societal conditions of the country where the program takes place. The methods used in this program are intended to foster the acquisition of French both in and out of the classroom. The acquisition will take place through students' and teachers' active interaction with the language and daily life in the host country. Students will read, write, and speak French on a daily basis and will be required to analyze social, political, and cultural aspects of their surroundings. Through this process, students also will have the opportunity to develop new perspectives with regard to peoples of other cultures and a point of comparison upon which to base questions of human existence.

FR389 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

FR401 French Lit & the 19th Century GD WI

French Literature and the 19th Century. A study of representative oral and written passages from various French authors of the 19th century (FR 401) and the 20th century (FR 402). Analysis of readings and listening programs in discussions and compositions. The course also covers the arts and history of that period.

FR402 French Lit & the 20th Century GD WI

French Literature and the 20th Century. A study of representative oral and written passages from various French authors of the 19th century (FR 401) and the 20th century (FR 402). Analysis of readings and listening programs in discussions and compositions. The course also covers the arts and history of that period.

FR403 Le Francais En Action (GD/WI)

A study of representative oral and written passages from French radio, Internet and television programs, interviews of con-temporary French singers and politicians, songs, and analysis of contemporary French films. Discussions of current French issues based on several French sources.

FR404 Le Conte Francais(GD)(WI)

A study of representative short stories from the various periods of French literature. The course offers an analysis of the readings in both discussions and composition in order to develop a facility in reading, speaking, and writing.

FR305 Imm. Et Int. En France Moderne

Immigration et Intégration dans la France moderne. This course addresses a number of contemporary issues in modern France with regards to its policies and practices of immigration. After a brief examination of traditional conceptions of the French nation and of French citizenship, we pass to a historical overview of the causes of significant waves of immigration in France, such as the world wars, French colonialism, and the Syrian refugee crisis. The course concludes with some in-depth examinations of salient issues related to immigration into France, in particular, racial and cultural integration, French Republicanism, recent upsurges in populism, laïcité, and the 2018 soccer World Cup. The course fulfills an Intermediate Writing core requirement. Students will complete short writing assignments through multiple drafts, and complete research and a presentation on a topic of their choice.

FR415 French Lab Coordinator

This course meets once weekly to coordinate the French labs offered by upper-division French students. Students receive training in Second Language Acquisition and SLA pedagogy. Discussions focus on theories of SLA, as well as on the creation of weekly lesson plans for the French labs.

FR423 Francophone Feminisms GD WI

This course serves as an introduction to movements and theories of feminism in France and the French-speaking world, and is intended to be taken following at least one 300-level course. Students learn about the history and theories of feminism that emerged in the French language from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. Course readings will include a range of literary, cultural, and theoretical texts; class discussions and lectures will focus on understandings of feminisms (First, Second, and Third Waves, as well as forms of proto-feminism before the Revolution) and of the female condition in France. This class is taught in French.

FR433 Visual Arts of the Francophone World

Visual Arts of the Francophone World. This course examines French and Francophone visual arts from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, and is intended to be taken following at least one 300-level course. Students learn about major artistic movements in France through techniques of both art historical and literary study. Course readings will include a range of literary, cultural, and theoretical texts; class discussions and lectures will focus on understandings techniques of art historical analysis, as well as the history and development of the visual arts in France and the French-speaking world. This class is taught in French. Satisfies Core Fine Arts requirement.

FR450 French Nationalism(s) GD WI

This takes as its point of departure a number of myths and symbols that are woven into the fabric of the French national identity. These historical personalities and events-from Charlemagne to Joan of Arc to the Wars of Religion-help members of the French nation define what it means to be French. But they are also interpretations of historical events and movements rather than reproductions of them. Using a comparative framework, we look at how certain history is put to use in the construction and upkeep of national consciousness. Class time will consist of presentations and discussions led by the professor and students. Coursework will include analysis of model texts, short writing exercises, formal oral presentations, multiple draft compositions, and a final project based on analysis of a chosen theme. In-class instruction and discussion are in French only. Satisfies Core Social Science requirement.

FR485 Independent Study

Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

FR489 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

FR489W Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

FR495 French Capstone

Students will work with their major advisor on a final project. These projects may include an internship, writing or performance of a dramatic work, or a written research paper with approval from the student's advisor. The final project will be presented to a public audience in a formal or informal setting. The student will work with the French Program faculty to organize, prepare and present their project. This course is offered as needed at the discretion of the department and should be taken during the final semester of a student's senior year, or during the fall semester if a student chooses to study abroad in the spring. This course is required for graduation from the French Program.

FR499 Senior Thesis

The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.