PH - Public Health

PH200 Public Health Field Experience

Public Health majors will be assigned a field placement in an appropriate setting. During the semester, students will be required to spend three hours per week per credit in the assigned setting.

PH289G Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PH321 Gardening & Community Health

This course combines an exploration of urban and community agriculture with practical, hands-on gardening skills specific to Montana. It will begin with a survey of the food and hunger situation in America and continue with an overview of the historical and current development of urban and community agriculture, with an emphasis on the community and health benefits associated with this model of agriculture. Prerequisite: none The educational goals of this course are that students will 1. Understand problems and impacts of community food and nutrition availability 2. Recognize the impact of local agriculture on community health, individual well-being, and economic development 3. Become familiar with strategies for community agriculture 4. Explore the possibilities and limits of local and urban agriculture 5. Develop a conceptual background of and participate in early spring gardening, harvesting, and season extension techniques for Montana (Zone 4), with a goal of providing food to local organizations before the end of the spring semester.

PH330G Public Health Methods GD CD SL

The course includes the history, evolution, and current status of health programs and services both globally and nationally. It also presents the philosophical perspectives of various health disciplines and the paradigms of health education, health promotion, and community health in contemporary society. Fall semester. Service Learning course. Fulfills either National Diversity or Global Diversity requirement; but cannot be used for both.

PH330N Public Health Methods ND CD SL

The course includes the history, evolution, and current status of health programs and services both globally and nationally. It also presents the philosophical perspectives of various health disciplines and the paradigms of health education, health promotion, and community health in contemporary society.

PH333 Public Health Theories & Practice

The purpose of this course is to expose students to aspects of program planning, implementation, and evaluation of health programs. The models for program planning, assessing needs, measurement, interventions, community organizing, community building, and allocation of resources will be discussed.

PH389 Special Topic

Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PH405 Senior Seminar (WI)

The purpose of this seminar is to provide senior level public health and health sciences majors information that will assist them in preparing for professional life. Students planning to attend graduate school should take this course during fall semester.

PH410 Management of Health Promotion Programs

This course is the study of methods of managing health promotion programs, including budgeting, performance appraisals, job descriptions, program models, managing employees, marketing and effective meetings.

PH425 Internship

Health Sciences or Public Health students will complete an internship in an appropriate setting. During the semester, students will be required to spend 3-18 hours per week in their internship site. For more information, please see program web page. Planning for internships must occur during the semester prior to participating in an internship.

PH485

Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

PH499 Senior Thesis

The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.