ISA Meknes, Morocco Study Site

In May of 2014, Carroll College entered into an agreement with International Study Abroad (ISA) to serve as the “school of record” for courses taught at the ISA Meknes, Morocco Study Site. Carroll only awards credits for these courses taught at this site to students who have been accepted by ISA to study at this center. These courses and the credentials of the Meknes instructors have undergone a thorough review by a faculty committee and meet Carroll curriculum requirements. The agreement to award credit fol- lows the best practice standards set forth in the Forum on Education Abroad Guidelines for School of Record Relationships, as well as the requirements outlined in the policy on Contractual Relationships with Organizations Not Regionally Accredited established by Carroll’s regional accreditor, the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.

AR101MM Beginning Modern Standard Arabic I

This level is designed for those who have little or no background knowledge in Arabic. Students will learn to read and write using the Arabic alphabet; they will also learn to conduct simple conversations for use in everyday situations.

AR102MM Beginning Arabic II

This level is designed for those who have little or no background knowledge in Arabic. Students will learn to read and write using the Arabic alphabet; they will also learn to conduct simple conversations for use in everyday situations. AR 101MM or demonstrated proficiency.

AR111MM Introduction to Moroccan Arabic(Darija)

Darija is how Moroccans refer to their dialect of the Arabic language. Over the centuries it has incorporated words and structures from a variety of native and neighboring languages although Arabic remains at the core. Darija is a spoken language and has not typically been considered in a written context. For this reason today one can find Darija written commonly in both Arabic and Latin script. Darija is spoken by about 90% of Moroccans today accounting for about 30 million people. This course is meant for English speaking students in order to introduce Darija's basic phonetics, vocabulary and core grammatical structures.

AR112MM Intro to Moroccan Arabic(darija) II

AR201MM Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I

Intermediate Arabic I is the first semester of Intermediate -level Modern Standard Arabic. The course will expand and further develop the students understanding and effective use of Modern Standard Arabic, focusing on Chapters Nine through Fourteen of Al-Kitaab (Part 1). The number of chapters covered may be increased if the students exhibit sufficient progress and proficiency in their studies to move forward.

AR202MM Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II

Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II is the second semester of Intermediate -level Modern Standard Arabic. The course will expand and further develop the students understanding and effective use of Modern Standard Arabic, focusing on Chapters Fifteen through twenty (Part One) of Al-Kitaab. The number of chapters covered may be increased if the students exhibit sufficient progress and proficiency in their studies to move forward. Students will focus on acquiring more vocabulary and an increased knowledge of the fundamental grammatical and morphological structures in order for them to attain a higher level of comprehending and communicating.

AR301MM Advanced Modern Standard Arabic I

Advanced Arabic I is the first semester of Advanced -level Modern Standard Arabic. The course will expand and further develop the students understanding and effective use of Modern Standard Arabic, focusing on Chapters one through four of Al-Kitaab (Part 2). The number of chapters covered may be increased if the students exhibit sufficient progress and proficiency in their studies to move forward.

AR302MM Advanced Modern Standard Arabic II

Advanced Arabic II is the second semester of Advanced -level Modern Standard Arabic. The course will be based and focus on Chapters five through eight of Al-Kitaab (Part 2). The number of chapters covered may be increased if the students exhibit sufficient progress and proficiency in their studies to move forward. This course is designed for students who have completed all chapters in Al-Kitaab (Part 1) and the first four chapters in (Part 2).

AR330MM Arabic for Diplomacy, Intern'l Rel & Pol

Arabic for Diplomacy, International Relations & Politics. The course offers students interested in the Arab world and Arabic Language the opportunity to develop their skills in Arabic Language for Politics, Diplomacy and International Relations. It assumes no previous knowledge of (or experience in) these fields. The course will introduce students to significant aspects of informative sentences, concepts, technical terms, phrases, idioms and collocations of words used in diplomacy, international relations and politics; structures of intergovernmental, governmental and quasi-governmental organizations and their policies in the Arab world; systems of legislative and executive institutions in the Arab world; and critical perspectives of concepts of Arab politics and diplomacy from Arab media. The most important attribute of this course is that it's designed to provide students with a focused look at diplomacy, politics and international relations in the Arab world while gaining proficiency in Arabic language. The course is designed for students who already have background knowledge in Modern Standard Arabic vocabulary and syntax, completing at least Beginning II level in Arabic language.

FR101MM Beginning French I

The Beginning French 1 course is based upon the four essential means of language acquisition; through reading, writing, listening and speaking. All of the contents of this course will be approached from this holistic perspective in order to immerse the student into the French language. This is the introduction to French language; its letters, phonetics, spelling, vocabulary and initial grammatical rules will be covered.

FR102MM Beginning French II

The course content for Beginning French 2 is based upon the four essential means of language acquisition; through reading, writing, listening and speaking. This is the continuation of the introduction to French language now focusing more specifically on vocabulary acquisition, phrases, grammatical rules and structures. Listening and oral exercises will be more heavily relied upon in order to help instill French fluency.

FR201MM Intermediate French I

This course is based on an innovative, structured and practical method. It is structured around well-articulated activities that allow for a progressive acquisition of a range of linguistic competencies. The objective is to lead the student to confront varied communicative situations by introducing different tasks and soliciting an active participation. While the course is not based on a single theme, the main objective is the acquisition of language skills for increased fluency. The course largely follows the textbook, Tempo 2.

FR202MM Intermediate French II

Intermediate French II builds on the competencies acquired in Intermediate French I, revisiting and further developing the learned skills. This course also develops communication skills, allowing students to participate in conversations and demonstrate their linguistic capabilities in terms of being able to speak with a degree of fluency. The course largely follows the textbook, Tempo 2.

FR301MM Advanced French I

Learning a foreign language is first and foremost an opening onto the world, or an entryway to a new universe that is at once linguistic, cultural, sociological, literary, etc. By delving deeper into oral comprehension and written French (pulled from multiple sources), students will be able to discover different realities and different points of view. Learning a foreign language is also a tool that allows one to build metaphorical bridges to reach the Other. Active listening, engaged speaking, and a capacity to clearly express oneself through writing make connections with people from other cultures and language backgrounds possible. Moreover, it is clear that, in today's world, a mastery of several languages is an incalculable advantage on the job market. Based on these premises, this course aims to develop a mastery of diverse components of the French language by means of an action-oriented approach. Following the methods of this pedagogical approach, this course is focused on different projects that reflect concrete learning situations that help students develop French language skills (reading, speaking, listening, and writing). Because the student will be in Morocco while taking the course, the projects will be grounded in a Moroccan context. This will enable them to enrich their understanding of the country, have otherwise unlikely encounters, and practice French in different interactions. The grammar topics will be based on perceived gaps in students' knowledge and will be pursued in collaboration with the professor and students throughout the course.

HI311MM Gender Studies: The Case of Morocco

Considering questions of gender in Moroccan society requires situating the topic in the broader historical, religious, social, cultural, political, geographic, and contemporary contexts of which it is a part. While our study focuses largely on Morocco, we will pay considerable attention to the broader Middle East and North Africa given the inextricable ties that bind this region, as well as the forces that drive them apart. It will consider gender in the pre-Islamic MENA region, as well as the changes introduced by Islam as they pertain to sex roles, male-female dynamics, and the degree to which male ideology has dominated social practices. We will examine both the Qur'an and Islamic law (Shari'a) for clues regarding questions of gender, as well as look at deeply rooted (but also changing) cultural notions of gender. As early as the19th century Moroccan women, like women in other parts of the region (i.e. Huda Sha'arwi and the feminist movement in Egypt), gained greater awareness of questions of women's rights and feminism. Critical examination of these topics requires an equally critical look at questions of men and masculinity, although the latter is much more recent as a field of study, as well as how relations between men and women continue to change. Beginning with the more general themes of history, culture, and religion, the course will then move to more recent matters. The Moudawana or Personal Status Code (viewed by many as inherently discriminatory); the upheavals of the early 21st century; questions of politics and power; and the on-going reverberations in the wake of the Arab spring are just a few of the topics that will occupy our time and discussion. From dress, relations between men and women, the family, and the larger questions of history, religion, and culture this course engages both students and professor in a conversation that is taking place not only here in Morocco but across the Middle East and North Africa.

IR312MM Geostrategic Importance of Morocco

The Geostrategic Importance of Morocco in International Relations and Alliance-Building. This course examines the political and economic effects of the modern and contemporary Morocco. Specific analysis is placed on the role of the country in regional and international affairs, along with a geographical and historical background, relating to colonization and globalization, which has participated in this accomplishment. The course, therefore, provides an assessment of the challenges and the achievements of Morocco as part of the international community since the beginning of the 20th century.

IR331MM The Representation of Geopolitical Confl

Irreconcilable Differences? The Representation of Geopolitical Conflict In Western &

IR332MM Peace & Conflict Resolution

The course seeks to provide an overview of the theories, principles and tools used in the field of peace and conflict resolution. Students will acquire an understanding of the nature, dynamics, and intractability aspects of contemporary world conflicts and develop skills necessary to confront the challenges of conflict and peace building situations across cultures. This will be accomplished through role play and simulation, various negotiating techniques and strategies to deal with, manage, and attempt to resolve some of the most intractable conflicts of our time.

LAS310MM Exploring Moroccan History, Culture & So

Exploring Moroccan History, Culture & Society. Morocco has a very long history and a diverse culture. Its identity has been shaped by so many peoples and civilisations which, beside the native Berbers, date back to the Phoenicians, the Carthaginians, the Romans, Greeks, and the Byzantines. The Arabo-Islamic civilisation in the 8th C.was later challenged and enriched by the indelible marks of European conquest and presence. Like the sweeping majority of world countries and as early as the seventies, Morocco has ridden the tide of globalisation leaving no doubt as to its liberal economic outlook, while making sure to preserve its authenticity as a Muslim, Arab-Amazigh country. The result is a hybrid culture that affects nearly every aspect of Moroccan identity and way of life. This melting pot is now visible everywhere. It is not surprising to see in the same area a donkey drawn cart driving by fancy glass high buildings. Since the death of Hassan II in 1999, Morocco has been transformed quite substantially; and this is evidenced at different levels, politically, socially, and culturally. This class explores the dynamics of Morocco today as expressed in literature, arts, media, politics, etc.

LAS314MM Intercultural Development for Students a

Intercultural Development for Students Abroad: Identity & Cultural Otherness. Studies have shown that students are likely to gain intercultural sensitivity/awareness/competence more quickly and more efficiently during their time abroad if equipped with a theoretical framework within which they can analyze and interpret their experiences (VandeBerg, et. al. 2009). The aim of this course is to provide tools and activities that will allow students to reflect upon and analyze their intercultural experience and to help them discover its transformative potential (Savicki 2008). The course will invite students to reflect on their own identity/multiplicity/cultural references and will introduce different concepts that will help them to better understand and advance through their own process of intercultural development during their time abroad.

LAS320MM Islamic Civilization & Artisti

Islamic Civilization & Artistic Expression. This course is a broad overview of historical and contemporary cultural context, bridging diverse domains from religion and politics to architecture, music and popular culture. This course aims equally at bringing history and culture to bear upon contemporary global issues that frequently involve the Muslim and Arab World such as universal human rights, peace and conflict, cross cultural communication, and cultural critique. We will examine a myriad of artistic representations from throughout the Islamic World from across the ages in order tt ascertain a deeper interpretation of Islamic Civilizations.

PO330MM Islamic Society & Politics

This course is a broad overview of historical and contemporary cultural context, bridging diverse domains from religion and politics to architecture, music and popular culture. This course aims equally at bringing history and culture to bear upon contemporary global issues that frequently involve the Muslim and Arab World such as universal human rights, peace and conflict, cross cultural communication, and cultural critique. We will examine a myriad of artistic representations from throughout the Islamic World from across the ages in order tt ascertain a deeper interpretation of Islamic Civilizations.

SO289MM Morocco: Changes and Cultural Identity

Morocco: Changes and Cultural Identity The course examines the major social, cultural, intellectual, and human rights transformations in Morocco over the last four decades, stressing the undergoing tensions between the secular liberals and conservatives (especially Islamists) across gender, religion, language, and sexual politics all within a context of democratization. It also explores changing identities and the complexity of Moroccan cultural politics. It is based on a balanced combination of the exploration of major academic scholarship from a comparative new academic outlooks and multi-disciplinary perspectives, along with an insight into the lives and experiences of Moroccans. Above all, it traces the blended trajectories and trends in Moroccan society and culture, stressing the pressuring challenges to Moroccan national identities posed by globalization, attempts at democratization, secularism, conservatism, and fundamentalism. This course is also designed to understand male-female dynamics, sexual politics, youth culture, and ethnicities in literature, philosophy, anthropology, popular culture, politics, religion, human rights, and sociology.

SO389MM Migration and Transnationalism in Morocc

This course explores different issues related to migration in the Moroccan context and enable students to develop a critical perspective of contemporary mobility. In order to engage intellectually with the topic, students will first be introduced to the context of migration in Morocco (including the legal framework of Moroccan migration policy) in addition to the main concepts of the course: mobility, transnationalism, identity, integration, and human rights. Based on contemporary research conducted in Morocco and abroad, the second part of the course will initially address Moroccan migration (by focusing on internal and circular migration and on gender issues); subsequently � Westerners' � migration (with a particular focus on lifestyle and family migration); and lastly Sub-Saharan migration (by raising issues related to social perceptions, borders and humans rights). In addition to a conceptual and ethnographical understanding, the course will offer students the possibility to relate to the subjects on a more personal level through practical activities: group discussions, meetings with migrants and activists, documentaries, and a visit to an association that works with immigrants among other activities. Finally, students will have the opportunity to work on, and to present a research project related to migration to/from Morocco.

TH321MM Three Religions, Three Peoples, One God

This course considers the three major monotheistic religions (Islam, Judaism and Christianity) in terms of their common historical origins, as well as their manifestations in today's world, particularly vis-�-vis contemporary Morocco, a powerful example of a pluralistic, multi-ethnic, multi-religious society.