ILC - Integrative Learning Course

ILC 289H The Elusive Self

An Integrative Learning course where students receive CORE credit in both Psychology and Philosophy.

The Elusive Self: On Mind, Brain, & Consciousness.

ILC 289I Photography & Catholic Social Teaching

An Integrative Learning course where students receive CORE credit in both Fine Arts and Theology.

Social Documentary Photographer & Catholic Social Teaching.

Students will learn fundamental camera skills and how to apply them to the field of documentary photography. They will also learn the core themes of Catholic Social Teaching. The course will culminate with each student presenting a portfolio of work employing the techniques of documentary photography and illustrating at least one core theme of Catholic Social Teaching. The course will include a review of the principle photographers in the field (e.g., Henri Cartier-Bresson, W. Eugene Smith, Sebastio Salgado, etc.) and the role of documentary photography in promoting social awareness and change.

ILC 289J Philosophy & Poetry

ILC 389C World Cinema (GD)

An Integrative Learning course where students receive CORE credit in both Literature and global diversity.

This interdisciplinary course will focus on social justice and human rights issues in the world through a critical engagement with the aesthetics and the politics of African, Asian, European, and Latin and North American cinemas. This course will have two major service learning components: Students enrolled in this course will take a leadership role in the organization of the Social Justice Human Rights Film Festival, which will be open to the Carroll and Helena community. Students will also conduct research throughout the semester culminating in the production of short videos on social justice and human rights issues in the local community.

ILC 389D Historical Atrocity, Suffering & God

An Integrative Learning course where students receive CORE credit in both History and Theology.

This course will seek to weave together the problem and question of God with historical case studies illuminating humanity's capacity for cruelty, atrocity, and genocide. By exploring some of the leading philosophical and theological arguments regarding the problem of evil, for example, alongside real historical examples, we will force the class to confront the reality that neither discipline has all the answers to the difficult questions posed by the human potential for evil.

ILC 389E Holocaust: Psych & History

The destruction of European Jewry is among the most heinous crimes of Nazi Germany. The Holocaust seems almost inconceivable; yet, close study shows it as a set of comprehensible human interactions. This course integrates psychological perspectives into the study of the historical event. Misconstrued psychological concepts (e.g., personality and racial differences) informed German policies under Hitler. Psychological scholars immigrated to the United States as the Nazi party gained power, and fields of psychological inquiry developed after World War II to better understand what had occurred (e.g., obedience to authority, racism). This ILC will explore the motivations and actions of those involved while familiarizing the students with the origins and operation of this genocide.